A hasty word on why someone else’s abortion has nothing to do with you.

It is a choice to accept those choices different than yours.

Jasmine Poulton

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Photo by Gayatri Malhotra on Unsplash

Up until recently, my ultimate goal in life was to become a mother. From a young age, I always felt strongly that should I get pregnant, regardless of my situation, I wouldn’t have an abortion — I would figure it out, no matter what I had to sacrifice. I felt too scared that might be my only chance of having a child.

There’s no way of knowing if this is how I would have felt for sure since I’ve never been pregnant. I certainly don’t know if I would have felt this way had I gotten pregnant by rape, if I were in an abusive relationship, if I was 13 years old, if I were an addict, if it would risk my health, if I would have to pay to give birth, if I didn’t have accepting parents, if I was offered nothing in terms of support, childcare, healthcare, education — if I had grown up in America.

My point here is that, even with this strong inclination toward what I would choose personally, I have never felt the desire to impose my choices on somebody else. I have supported friends through their pregnancies as I have supported them through abortions. What I feel attached to, personally and emotionally, has absolutely nothing to do with anybody else, and their choices have nothing to do with me. Who would I be to impose my individual feelings — a culmination of my skewed life — on another person? Why should I care? It has absolutely nothing to do with me.

The fact that Christianity — interpretations of a weird old book, PERSONAL BELIEFS in old STORIES — is dictating modern law is embarrassing. I think any progressive state would agree that religion and politics are not the same thing and should not be governing one another.

I write these statements and questions without editorial regard because I am grasping at a way to understand what is wrong with these people fighting so hard to “save” something that does not need to affect them. Why do they care? Do I feel the need to shut down your churches? To force you to realize the ridiculousness in your god, that you choose over science, that you choose over real people, that you choose over the present? I do not, because (to point out the, apparently not, obvious) it is…

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Jasmine Poulton

English poet, writer and actress based in Los Angeles. Founder and editor of “Sundays” Journal. ~Perpetually speaking metaphorically~